Extracellular Matrix Optimization for Enhanced Physiological Relevance in Hepatic Tissue-Chips

Extracellular Matrix Optimization for Enhanced Physiological Relevance in Hepatic Tissue-Chips

The cellular microenvironment is influenced explicitly by the extracellular matrix (ECM), the main tissue support biomaterial, as a decisive factor for tissue growth patterns. The recent emergence of hepatic microphysiological systems (MPS) provide the basic physiological emulation of the human liver for drug screening. However, engineering microfluidic devices with standardized surface coatings of ECM may improve MPS-based organ-specific emulation for improved drug screening. The influence of surface coatings of different ECM types on tissue development needs to be optimized. Additionally, an intensity-based image processing tool and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) sensor may assist in the analysis of tissue formation capacity under the influence of different ECM types. The current study highlights the role of ECM coatings for improved tissue formation, implying the additional role of image processing and TEER sensors. We studied hepatic tissue formation under the influence of multiple concentrations of Matrigel, collagen, fibronectin, and poly-L-lysine. Based on experimental data, a mathematical model was developed, and ECM concentrations were validated for better tissue development. TEER sensor and image processing data were used to evaluate the development of a hepatic MPS for human liver physiology modeling. Image analysis data for tissue formation was further strengthened by metabolic quantification of albumin, urea, and cytochrome P450. Standardized ECM type for MPS may improve clinical relevance for modeling hepatic tissue microenvironment, and image processing possibly enhance the tissue analysis of the MPS.

Journal: Polymers, IF 4.329

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